Bupropion

Bupropion
(byoo-PRO-pee-on)

Aplenzin, Budeprion SR, Buproban, Forfivo XL, Wellbutrin, Zyban

Bupropion
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Bupropion is used to treat depression. It can improve your mood and feelings of well-being. It may work by helping to restore the balance of certain natural chemicals (neurotransmitters) in your brain.

Bupropion may also be used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or to help people quit smoking by decreasing cravings and nicotine withdrawal effects. It may be used to prevent autumn-winter seasonal depression (seasonal affective disorder). This drug may also be used with other medications to treat bipolar disorder (depressive phase).

It may take 4 or more weeks before you notice the full benefit of this drug. Continue to take this medication as directed by your doctor even after you feel better. Talk to your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

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Some products that may interact with this drug include: amantadine, certain x-ray dyes (including iomeprol), levodopa, nicotine products (such as patches, gum, or spray), regular use of sedatives (such as alprazolam), stimulants, tamoxifen, warfarin.

Taking MAO inhibitors with this medication may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before and after treatment with this medication. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

Other medications can affect the removal of bupropion from your body, which may affect how bupropion works. Examples include cyclophosphamide, orphenadrine, thiotepa, antiplatelet drugs (including clopidogrel, ticlodipine), anti-seizure drugs (such as carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin), HIV drugs (such as efavirenz, ritonavir), rifamycins (such as rifampin), among others.

Bupropion can speed up the removal of other drugs from your body, which may affect how they work. Examples of affected drugs include citalopram, antiarrhythmics (such as propafenone, flecainide), antidepressants (such as desipramine, paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline), antipsychotics (such as haloperidol, thioridazine), beta-blockers (such as metoprolol), among others.

Also report the use of drugs which might increase seizure risk (decrease seizure threshold) when combined with bupropion, such as antipsychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine), tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone) or theophylline, among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details.

Large amounts of caffeine and other stimulants, such as those found in weight loss and cold/sinus medications, can increase the chance of seizures with this drug. Check all nonprescription/prescription/herbal drug labels for caffeine and other stimulants (e.g., ephedra). Consult your doctor or pharmacist.

This medication may interfere with certain medical/laboratory tests (including brain scan for Parkinson's disease), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Common side effects of Bupropion include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Increased sweating
  • Joint aches
  • Sore throat
  • Blurred vision
  • Strange taste in the mouth
  • Dizziness

 

If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: chest pain, fainting, fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, hearing problems, ringing in the ears, severe headache, mental/mood changes (e.g., agitation, anxiety, confusion, hallucinations, memory loss), uncontrolled movements (tremor), unusual weight loss or gain.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: muscle pain/tenderness/weakness, change in the amount of urine.

This drug may infrequently cause seizures. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience a seizure. If you have a seizure while taking bupropion, you should not take this drug again.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

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Dr. Stephen Covey

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